Enterprise analytics (Davenport, 2012)

Organizations are capturing exponentially larger amounts of data than ever, and now they have to figure out what to do with it. Using analytics, you can harness this data, discover hidden patterns, and use this knowledge to act meaningfully for competitive advantage. Suddenly, you can go beyond understanding “how, when, and where” events have occurred, to understand why – and use this knowledge to reshape the future. Now, analytics pioneer Tom Davenport and the world-renowned experts at the International Institute for Analytics (IIA) have brought together the latest techniques, best practices, and research on analytics in a single primer for maximizing the value of enterprise data.

http://www.ftpress.com/store/enterprise-analytics-optimize-performance-proces… 

Trasforming business (big data and beyond, 2013)

“Based on the findings of an extensive research project that surveyed more than 5,500 enterprise employees and functional decision makers across the United States and China, Transforming Business: Big Data, Mobility and Globalization explores the influence of technology in the workplace and the implications to company culture, functional responsibilities and competitive advantage. This in-depth analysis illuminates emerging technological trends, the changing workforce, and the shifting face of business and industry while offering prescriptive guidance to leaders”

http://media.wiley.com/product_data/excerpt/8X/11185196/111851968X-49.pdf

Big Data (a book preview, 2013)

“The data we deal with is diverse. Users create content like blog posts, tweets, social network interactions, and photos. Servers continuously log messages about what they’re doing. Scientists create detailed measurements of the world around us. The internet, the ultimate source of data, is almost incomprehensibly large. This astonishing growth in data has profoundly affected businesses. Traditional database systems, such as relational databases, have been pushed to the limit. In an increasing number of cases these systems are breaking under the pressures of “Big Data.” Traditional systems, and the data management techniques associated with them, have failed to scale to Big Data”

http://www.manning.com/marz/BD_meap_ch01.pdf

 

The rise of marketing/market research (2012)

“As the complexity of markets is too great for any individual to understand, intermediaries and interpreters who concentrate on a limited number of the markets’ core features are needed. Their work, which bridges the gap between the subsystems of markets and corporations, is generally called marketing. Marketing tries to process information on markets and translate it into a language that corporations can use to steer their activities. It is about reconciling the imperatives of production  with the needs and desires of customers. The agency of consumers generates insecurity among marketers, who have to develop methods to overcome information asymmetries. This task calls for professional, even scientific expertise, as well as special instruments and institutions”

http://www.amazon.com/Marketing-Market-Research-Worlds-Consumption/dp/0230341…

 

 

Into the river: big data and market insights

“The move from a deductive approach to an inductive approach runs parallel to the move from hunch-based management to evidence-based management. In the past, managers who came up with the best story and convinced people of their hypothesis, regardless of what the data said, created action in the organization. More and more, such a situation is being replaced by evidence-based management where decisions are driven by true market information and mere hunches lose their importance. Given this trend, the well positioned Market Insights function becomes the brain of the organization”.

http://www.amazon.com/INTO-THE-RIVER-Situated-Cognition/dp/1614347212/ref=sr_…

Honest Signals (social science/big data)

Honest Signals (Petland, 2010, The MIT Press)

“For the fi rst time, we can precisely map the behavior of large numbers of people as they go about their normal lives. By using cell phones and electronic badges with integrated sensors, my students and I have observed hundreds of participants for periods of up to a year. In the process we amassed hundreds of thousands of hours of detailed, quantitative data about natural, day-to-day human behavior—far more data of these kind than have ever been available before. A new measurement tool such as this often brings with it a new understanding of what you are measuring. What we have found is that many types of human behavior can be reliably predicted from biologically based honest signaling behaviors. These ancient primate signaling mechanisms, such as the amount of synchrony, mimicry, activity, and emphasis, form an unconscious channel of communication between people—a channel almost unexplored except in other apes”

http://www.amazon.com/Honest-Signals-Shape-World-Bradford/dp/0262515121/ref=s…

 

Marketing as surveillance

Marketing as surveillance (from Inside Marketing, 2012, ed. Zwick and Cayla)

“The consumer becomes knownin the compartmentalization of their data, assembledin the production of a consumer brand,and all of this is made possible by forms of commercial sociology that operate as complex andeffective surveillance systems. This notion of commercial sociology describesthe kinds of analysis done by contemporary marketing companies. Customers are reduced to datasets, as information about purchasing preferences and proclivities is detailed to provide marketers with useful profiles. Such commercial sociology thus simulates consumers for analysis. But it also interprets these behaviors and normalizes them as a part of the surveillance process and, in addition, incorporates further information on the activities and preferences of consumers as feedback”

http://ebooks.narotama.ac.id/files/Inside%20Marketing;%20Practices,%20Ideolog…